Chandigarh by Doshi Levien

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Chandigarh by Doshi Levien for Moroso

Milan 2012: London designers Doshi Levien have designed an armchair and sofa for Italian brand Moroso that's inspired by Modernist architect Le Corbusier and the Indian city of Chandigarh that he masterplanned in the 1950s.

Chandigarh by Doshi Levien for Moroso

The sofa consists of large upholstery pieces, covered in leather or fabric, sitting within a delicate steel frame.

Chandigarh by Doshi Levien for Moroso

Doshi Levien have also designed a Chandigharh-inspired fabric pattern for the sofa as well as a series of coffee tables to compliment the collection.

Chandigarh by Doshi Levien for Moroso

Their work was displayed at the Salone Internazionale del Mobile in April.

Chandigarh by Doshi Levien for Moroso

See all our stories about Milan 2012 here, plus photos on Facebook and Pinterest.

Chandigarh by Doshi Levien for Moroso

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Chandigarh by Doshi Levien for Moroso

Here's some more information from Doshi Levien:


Chandigarh Sofas and tables for Moroso.

The city of Chandigarh in India, known for the architecture by Le Corbusier, is the subject and name of the new collection of sofas by Doshi Levien for Moroso.

Chandigarh by Doshi Levien for Moroso

The principles of modernism, apparently totally unrelated to the city of Chandigarh yet deeply rooted in its identity, have inspired Nipa and Jonathan in the creation of a quintessentially modern seating collection, with a contemporary approach.

Chandigarh by Doshi Levien for Moroso

“For us the Chandigarh sofa is the coming together of modernity, sensuality, graphics and eccentric qualities”, claim the Anglo-Indian designer couple.

Chandigarh by Doshi Levien for Moroso

The Chandigarh sofa is soft and comfortable yet at the same time compact, visually slim and lightweight. The seat is in moulded foam and rests on a frame in iron like a precious stone set in a ring.

Chandigarh by Doshi Levien for Moroso

" The covers are in leather or fabric with a printed pattern designed by Doshi & Levien which pays homage to the memory of the city of Chandigarh.

Chandigarh by Doshi Levien for Moroso

A series of tables compliment the Chandigarh collection, further enriching the architectural material palette using a combination of glass, terrazzo, polished metal and tubular steel.

Chandigarh by Doshi Levien for Moroso

  • okpala

    beautiful!!! very smart interpretation of Corbusier's architecture…

  • costa

    Not my beautiful backside…

  • Greenish

    The chair looks ace but pretty uncomfortable – what's the point of armrests if they have a ruddy great seam where you want to rest your arm?

    The table, however, is sexy.

    • unliked

      I thought of the seam/arm factor too but I guess its a bit too high to use as an armrest. A 'in use' photograph could help understand this better.
      I'd like to hear Nipa and Jonathan's views on this.

      Pictures of furniture should always include people – its like half the story.

  • http://dailygrail.com/ Red Pill Junkie

    I'm not crazy about the colors, but I like the form :)

  • http://www.unlike.in horrible haridas

    DL is always originally and beautifully indo-western with their general aesthetic – these pieces are no different.

    However, in this case i'd like to know more about how the pieces are 'deeply rooted in its (Chandigarh's) identity'. Maybe its all there in principle someplace within the thought process, but I don't 'feel' the Chandigarh in it. When something qualifies for a name that strong, it should emanate that feeling on a simpler observer/consumer level. Though that's my personal opinion as a designer who's spent a decade in Chandigarh.

  • Bassel

    It would've been easier on the eye if the steel frame mimicked the angularity of the back of the upholstered piece.

  • Biads

    *shrug* Why can't we leave the 1950s in the 1950s?

    I'd say the chairs look uncomfortable, but there are no people in them, so I can't really judge.

    And yes, isn't the birdeye view all balanced and lovely, as that's what really matters…

    I hate this.