House in Sanbonmatsu
by Hironaka Ogawa

| 3 comments
 

Chunks missing from the sloping roof of this house in Kagawa by Japanese architect Hironaka Ogawa reveal an open-air courtyard at the centre (+ slideshow).

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

The two-storey house occupies a plot around twice the size of neighbouring properties, so the architect designed a gently sloping roof to play down the scale, then removed sections to create a central void.

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

"The idea of cutting out a volume from the hipped roof is quite simple," says Hironaka Ogawa, but he explains that it "gives various volume impressions in different angles and a less oppressive feeling to the neighbours".

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

Most rooms are arranged around the perimeter of the courtyard, including a double-height kitchen and living room with a sloping ceiling that follows the angle of the roof. Only two bedrooms are located upstairs and are accessed via a mezzanine corridor.

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

Square windows are dotted across the walls throughout the house, creating apertures between rooms and out to the courtyard.

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

Terraces and gardens wrap the exterior of the building, while a tiny courtyard is encased in glass beside the entrance and a wooden deck stretches across one side of the roof.

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

We've recently published several projects from Tokyo-based Hironaka Ogawa, who set up his studio in 2005. Others include a dental clinic in Gunma and a house with indoor trees, also in Kagawa. See more architecture by Hironaka Ogawa on Dezeen.

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

See more Japanese houses »

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

Photography is by Daici Ano.

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

Here's the full project description from Hironaka Ogawa:


House in Sanbonmatsu

This project is to design a private residence along a driveway in Kagawa Prefecture in Sikoku.

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

The site was plotted by the town redemarcation project and the construction site occupies twice the size of the surrounding ones.

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

The neighboring houses are mostly two-storey-high and standing on the small sites. Therefore, 1st and 2nd floor volume are the same and box-shaped design.

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

In contrast, this house has achieved a well-balanced exterior shape by introducing a long hipped roof. The roof is partly cutout and it is used as a courtyard that lets the sunlight and wind into the house, and the rooms and corridors are placed around it. What is more, the living room, dining room and kitchen are connected vertically and mildly by the voids.

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

The garden surrounding the house was tilted toward to the house in order to provide better views to all the rooms.

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

Despite the fact that the idea of cutting out a volume from the hipped roof is quite simple, it gives various volume impressions in different angles and a less oppressive feeling to the neighbours. What's more, the change of the room volumes provides various views.

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

Above: ground floor plan - click for larger image

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

Above: first floor plan - click for larger image

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

Above: section one - click for larger image

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

Above: section two - click for larger image

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

Above: south elevation

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

Above: east elevation

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

Above: north elevation

House in Sanbonmatsu by Hironaka Ogawa

Above: west elevation

  • Niki

    Fantastic! Except the concrete wall, but otherwise everybody would stop and stare.

  • Joe M

    Beautiful design and efficient layout. I agree that the concrete wall detracts. If done in my area, it would be tagged on the first night.

  • Gary Walmsley

    Ogawa—are you kidding?

    The interior is so gorgeous and the exterior facing the street looks like the outside of a gas station or convenience store!

    Unleaded or Regular?