Casa Cumbres by
Taller Hector Barroso

| 10 comments
 

This house in Mexico City by local firm Taller Hector Barroso is built around a courtyard to bring in more natural light and to make up for a shortage of exterior views (+ slideshow).

Casa Cumbres house in Mexico City by Taller Hector Barroso

Taller Hector Barroso designed the house for a mother and son in the capital's Santa Fe neighbourhood, creating a two-storey structure with a penthouse on the roof.

Casa Cumbres house in Mexico City by Taller Hector Barroso

Natural grey stone clads most of the house's exterior, interspersed with pine slats that wrap some of the lower walls around the entrance.

Casa Cumbres house in Mexico City by Taller Hector Barroso

The architects used the same stone for the walls surrounding the courtyard and added more pine to create the surface of the deck.

Casa Cumbres by Taller Hector Barroso

"The project is based on communication with the outside and outside," they said, comparing the facade with the courtyard elevations. "We sought to eliminate the boundaries between the two so they were connected visually and spatially, generating views that extend towards the edge of the plot."

Casa Cumbres house in Mexico City by Taller Hector Barroso

Glazed doors fold back to allow the house to be completely opened out to the courtyard, connecting the space with living and dining rooms on either side.

Casa Cumbres house in Mexico City by Taller Hector Barroso

"By having the indoor and outdoor continuity we generated light-filled spaces with natural ventilation," added the architects.

Casa Cumbres house in Mexico City by Taller Hector Barroso

A trio of large square windows sit within recesses on the rear facade, overlooking a garden that can be accessed from both the living room and a bedroom on the ground floor.

Casa Cumbres house in Mexico City by Taller Hector Barroso

More bedrooms and a second living room occupy the second floor, while the glazed rooftop penthouse is sheltered beneath a steel roof that protrudes over the edge of the walls.

Casa Cumbres by Taller Hector Barroso

Hardwood timber floors throughout the house tie in with the decked surface of the courtyard, which has a single tree growing in its centre, and interior walls feature sections of marble panelling.

Casa Cumbres by Taller Hector Barroso

Photography is by Yoshihiro Koitani.

Here's a short project description from the architects:


Casa Cumbres

Located in Santa Fe at Mexico City in one of the most exclusive areas of the city, the project is built around a courtyard, due to the shortage of exterior views. From this courtyard different areas of the program are connected as well as an extension of the living room. Boundaries are lost and create a indoor-outdoor which gives more fluidity into space. The living room area can be completely open witch enriches natural lighting and ventilation. The inner courtyard was the main driver of the project and is the main element in the composition of the project.

Casa Cumbres by Taller Hector Barroso

The presence of textures is very important; we used different woods of pine and a variety of natural stones. Finally on the rooftop we proposed a set of lines and lightness, we have a floated slab of steel to contain the playground witch takes advantage of the remaining outdoor area.

Casa Cumbres by Taller Hector Barroso

The inspiration for the project is the integration of the house to the immediate context, the incorporation of natural light to the interiors and the play of textures.

Casa Cumbres by Taller Hector Barroso
Ground floor plan - click for larger image

The project is based on communication with the outside/inside. We sought to eliminate the boundaries between the two so they were connected visually and spatially, generating views that extend towards the edge of the plot. Another important factor that was light. By having is indoor-outdoor continuity we generated light-filled spaces with natural ventilation.

Casa Cumbres by Taller Hector Barroso
First floor plan - click for larger image

The main idea in choosing the materials for the house was to highlight this same connection from the outside to the inside, several tests were made with different types of materials until we found the proper relationship between the taste of the client, the architect, the texture and the integration with the outside.

Casa Cumbres by Taller Hector Barroso
Second floor plan - click for larger image

Light is one of the elements that best define all spaces, each room is naturally lit and surrounded by gardens, the interior and exterior are intermingled with the textures of vegetation through the crystals and the different finishes in the spaces: hardwood floors, marble wall panelling, wooden walls and continuity of material outward. In the end, interior spaces end up speaking the same language as the outside by means of light and texture.

Casa Cumbres by Taller Hector Barroso
Section - click for larger image

Location: Mexico City, Mexico
Clients: Single family
Building area: 635m2
Credits: Hector Barroso
Partner architects: Alejandro Cortina, Rafael Montiel, Flavio Velazco

  • Onelab

    “A shortage of exterior views”? I thought that the house would be surrounded by buildings with no natural light through the facades. Maybe they should have designed more and bigger windows? Poor them.

  • Concerned Citizen

    It appears that the lack of exterior views is just an excuse for the pitiful space called a courtyard. Sorry, but a twig and a plank do not a courtyard make.

  • Hallie

    I think what they mean by lack of exterior views might be that the view outside is not favourable. I love this home and would love even more to live in it!

  • JB Hope

    I wholeheartedly agree.

  • sickofbuls$%*

    Alas, the Instagram aesthetic spreads to architectural photography… SIGH.

  • SimonViau

    Poor tree. It’s completely alone :(

    • jens1dk

      I agree.

  • saul

    That courtyard its so small in proportion to the house. Another example of very bad architecture trying to be covered with a lot of expensive materials!

  • http://dailygrail.com/ Red Pill Junkie

    ‘Exclusive area’ and a ‘shortage of views’. Sounds just like Mexico city.

  • David Wall

    I like the courtyard and the single tree. I also liked the openness of the bottom floor. I would love to see this house in person.