Villa at Sengokubara
by Shigeru Ban

| 10 comments
 

This timber house in Kanagawa by Japanese architect Shigeru Ban has a square plan with a teardrop-shaped courtyard at its centre (+ slideshow).

Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban

Shigeru Ban planned the single-storey Villa at Sengokubara with a radial arrangement, creating a sequence of rooms that each face inwards towards the central courtyard.

Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban

The roof of the house angles gently inward, creating a canopy around the perimeter of the courtyard, and it varies in height to create lower ceilings at the building's entrance.

Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban

Timber columns and roof joists are exposed inside the building, and line the ceilings and rear walls of every room.

Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban

Spaced wooden slats form partitions and doorways between some rooms, allowing views between spaces.

Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban

A wooden staircase leads to a mezzanine level beneath the highest section of the room, which looks out over the main living and dining room.

Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban

Two study rooms are tucked away behind, while the kitchen and main bedrooms are positioned just beyond.

Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban

A sheltered terrace separates this side of the house from a guest suite containing two bedrooms and a bathroom.

Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban

Here's a short description from the architects:


Sengokubara S Residence

The 2‐storey wood structure residence is situated on a flag pole shaped site, 30m square in plan with a 15m diameter interior courtyard.

Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban

With the main living room centred on the interior courtyard, all spaces are arranged in a radial manner from the entrance.

Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban

The eight sliding doors separating the main living room and interior courtyard can be opened at any time so that the space can be used as one.

Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban

The structure is made up of wooden columns and beams, which are 75mm x 350mm L‐shaped pieces, also arranged in a radial manner, creating a large one way sloped roof.

Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban

The large roof varies in height, achieving ceiling heights between 2.4m to 7.5m.

Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban

Location: Hakone, Kanagawa, Japan
Architects: Shigeru Ban Architects
Project Team: Shigeru Ban, Nobutaka Hiraga, Wataru Sakaki, Jun Matsumori
Structural engineers: Hoshino Structural Engineering
General contractors Hakone Construction
Principal use: residence
Site area: 1770.00m2
Building area: 576.89m2
Total floor area: 452.60m2
Structure: timber
Number of storeys: 2

Site plan of Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban
Site plan - click for larger image
Floor plan of Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban
Floor plan - click for larger image
Elevation of Villa at Sengokubara by Shigeru Ban
Elevation - click for larger image
  • blau

    This is a house designed to be experienced in person as opposed to photos. Phenomenal – love how the roof ascends to finally allow space for the mezzanine. Gonna be a few spider families tho ;)

  • http://www.facebook.com/chuck.anziulewicz PolishBear

    While the structure is quite modern, there is something about the courtyard that evokes ancient tradition. Just another example of why I love the Japanese architectural aesthetic so much.

  • Julie G

    It’s beautiful, though the interior is a bit dark for my taste. It would be really interesting if he could use that sloped roof to collect rain water. I can see this as being a perfect desert dwelling.

    • Peter van der Veer

      The interiors are very light. They only appear dark; the photography has not been photoshopped to balance the extreme difference between interior and exterior light inside any building. Many photos you see on this site have had the interiors lightened or exteriors darkened or both. Examine all the photography and it will become evident.

  • Concerned Citizen

    The “timber beams and columns” appear to be plywood, rather than timber. The roof actually slopes in all directions, and not just one.

    That being said, this house is a good start. Having the only access to the main bedroom directly from the kitchen is quite unfortunate. Then, there is the issue of voyeurism, for which this house seems to be designed. I suppose it’s fine if there are no guests, but when there are- ugh. Perhaps a little more time in the design development stage would help out.

    • El Jiji

      Hmmm. I wouldn’t agree on the privacy issue. The guest rooms seem to be sufficiently separated from the rest of the house.

  • https://www.eroof.jp/ eROOF

    Last winter, in the midst of falling snow and swarm earthquakes, we participated in the construction of this building as the metal roof and wall cladding expert.

    The designed roof includes the third order surface, zero gradient, and gambrel profile. So we had to choose “cold weather spec of taper standing seam” to secure high waterproofness and to fit curved surface.

    Although the geometry was analysed to optimise construction by our design system, it was necessary to prepare hundreds of different trapezoid pieces and gradient/vertical batten seams that aligned according to normal vector lines from the radial timber trusses.

    http://twitpic.com/photos/eroof_jp
    https://twitter.com/eroof_jp
    https://www.facebook.com/eroof.inc
    https://www.eroof.jp

  • El Jiji

    Absolutely breathtaking. I can’t remember the last housing project I resonated so strongly with.

  • sultony

    Not a house that is warm, cosy and inviting. It’s rather an agricultural looking building, or if you stuck pipes on a central rotating spraying arm, it could double as a sewage plant.

  • Julie G

    Interesting. I’d much rather see the structure’s actual lighting in its natural setting than to see it altered for contrast’s sake without acknowledgment. It’s not very informative of the real possibilities of living in the building. I do love a courtyard, though.