House Unimog stores a truck
within its translucent base

| 9 comments
 

This black house by German studios Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur is raised up over a translucent base where the client's truck can be stored (+ slideshow).

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur

Located on a busy street near Tübingen, Germany, the building needed to accommodate both a residence and a workshop, so Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur decided to lift all the living spaces off the ground and create a garage underneath with a parking space for the client's Unimog - a cult four-wheel drive vehicle produced by Mercedes Benz.

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur
Photograph by Michael Schnabel

This prompted the architects to name the project House Unimog.

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur
Photograph by Michael Schnabel

"The concept was to stack the two different uses on top of each other in order to minimise the footprint on the site and to orient the living rooms from the street towards the landscape," said Fabian Evers.

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur

Opaque corrugated cladding covers the first-floor walls and roof, while the lower level is surrounded by translucent polycarbonate with matching ridges, allowing daylight to permeate the workshop.

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur

"The workspace is filled with filtered natural light during the daytime, and turns at night into a light box which glows into the neighbourhood," said Evers.

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur

A staircase extends up along one of the outer walls, leading through to the domestic spaces via a sheltered south-facing terrace that can be used for various activities, from al fresco dining to chopping wood for the fire.

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur

Glass doors connect the terrace with an open-plan living and dining area, with a bathroom and bedroom positioned beyond.

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur

Oriented strand board lines the walls and ceilings of all three rooms, and a wood-burning stove provides heating.

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur

Photography is by Sebastian Berger, apart from where otherwise indicated.

Here's some more information from Fabian Evers:


House Unimog


The unusual task and the difficult building site was at one hand a big challenge but on the other a big potential. The owner requested a workshop for his Unimog and a small residential unit.

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur

The site is located directly next to a street with heavy traffic and is surrounded by small private houses and farm buildings. A crucial parameter was the very tight cost frame.

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur

The concept was to stack the two different uses on top of each other in order to minimise the footprint on the site and to orient the living rooms from the street towards the landscape. The result is a vertically developed house. The variation of the two different uses reflects itself through the facade: The lower part of the workshop is clad with translucent polycarbonate elements.

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur

The workspace is filled with filtered natural light during the daytime, and turns at night into a light box which glows into the neighbourhood. The living space presents itself with its anthracite facade as a monolithic volume. Precise set windows and a generous south-oriented loggia enables beautiful views into the surrounding landscape.

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur

The chosen materials for the facade and inside the building underlines the pragmatic and reduced design concept: a house which is rather located in the typology of a rational farmhouse or of a workshop than a classical residential house.

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur
Photograph by Michael Schnabel

Project: low budget house – private house with mit workshop
Client: private
Period: 2011 - 2012
Floor area: 120 m2
Costs: 170.000 Euros

House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur
Site plan
House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur
Ground floor plan
House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur
First floor plan
House Unimog by Fabian Evers Architecture and Wezel Architektur
Cross section
  • Stophourous

    Although it sure looks good, it has very little love to share.

  • read

    “and turns at night into a light box which glows into the neighbourhood”. Isn’t this what is called light pollution?

  • fore

    Yes it is.

    • asolitarywave

      Hmm, that depends.If you take 110sqm by €170,000, then that comes in at just of €1,500 a sqm, which is very low cost. But more than half of that (with the loggia) is external / unheated warehouse space – €170,000 for a 50sqm 1 bed apartment and a shed doesn’t feel so cheap to me (but I know nothing about construction costs in Germany).

  • Don

    So welcoming: everyone can use your porch when you’re not home! And so discreet: everyone in the village can see when you leave or come back if it’s after dark. Also those steps look good till someone older tries to climb it (21 pieces) and what when it rains – no roof over it. As for me, it’s another of those really cool looking but impractical designs.

  • boom

    Cost: 170.000 euros for a uninhabitable warehouse, awesome!

  • Rae Claire

    Just looks like a fancy jobsite temporary office to me, not a home.

  • quinzark

    Looks to me like a dock-side workshop or a garage with a studio over it. Would not like to live there at all.

  • Richard

    I would love this building if I was single and a millionaire with several rather expensive automotive toys requiring lots of love and attention. Otherwise yes, it looks like a studio apartment above a workshop. But then one man’s heaven is another man’s hell.