Custhom launches digitally
embroidered wallpaper

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Traditional embroidery patterns combine with digital stitching technology in this embroidered wallpaper by London-based studio Custhom.

Embroidered wallpaper by CUSTHOM
Aves wallpaper

Custhom, founded by RCA graduates Nathan Philpott and Jemma Ooi, worked with skilled embroiderers to interpret historic designs to create two patterns called Berye, which is based on English patterns, and Aves, which is derived from Mexican designs.

Embroidered wallpaper by CUSTHOM
Aves wallpaper

"We’ve worked hard to develop the process," said Custhom. "We work with textiles craftsmen in the North of England, and have adapted their process and techniques to work with paper, creating large-scale designs which flood the wall with pattern and texture."

Embroidered wallpaper by CUSTHOM
Aves wallpaper

"We’ve taken traditional styles of embroidery and translated them with contemporary tools and digital embroidery techniques, giving the organic designs a clean graphic undertone," they added.

Embroidered wallpaper by CUSTHOM
Berye wallpaper

Berye, which is Middle English for ‘berry’, is screen printed by hand and then overlaid with digitally embroidered patterns that mimic a 17th century embroidery technique called Crewel to create a multi-layered design of branches, leaves and berries. The design is created using flint grey and peach thread on a light grey background.

Embroidered wallpaper by CUSTHOM
Berye wallpaper

Aves references traditional Mexican Otomi fabrics. A menagerie of creatures are stitched in navy or soft grey onto cream or dark charcoal paper.

Embroidered wallpaper by CUSTHOM
Aves wallpaper

"We were researching traditional textiles and embroidery techniques in the British Library and came across the Otomi designs," said the designers. "We were instantly drawn to the way the Otomi tribe use stitch and illustration to tell stories and capture their folklore."

Embroidered wallpaper by CUSTHOM
Aves wallpaper being machine embroidered

The Berye pattern has just  been launched while Aves was unveiled at the Maison & Objet fair in Paris earlier this year.

The wallpaper is made using high quality FSC-certified non-woven paper, which is strong enough to take the perforation holes from the needles without tearing. Both patterns are made in the UK and measure 55 centimetres by one metre.

  • Claudia Muñoz

    This is what I would call unethical technology. Are the designers aware of the risk this implies to original Otomí people in Mexico?

    Plus, who says their motifs are free and available for anybody in the world to copy them? Very bad idea.