Bicycles are stored on a pulley system in
Sydney house atrium by Tribe Studio

| 12 comments
 

A pulley system extending through the atrium of this house in Sydney, Australia, by local architects Tribe Studio, is designed so the owners can store bicycles and winch them out of view (+ slideshow).

House Bruce Alexander by Tribe Studio

Tribe Studio extended House Bruce Alexander by adding a new volume at the back made from masonry, timber and supporting structural steel columns, and built an attic above the existing first floor.

House Bruce Alexander by Tribe Studio

Hannah Tribe and her team designed the house for an artist, an environmental scientist and their young family.

House Bruce Alexander by Tribe Studio

"We extended the old double-storey terrace by adding a new volume and built an attic above the existing first floor in the front part of the house," Tribe Studio told Dezeen.

House Bruce Alexander by Tribe Studio

Inside, the bicycle pulley system in the atrium is viewed through small hinged openings from the upstairs bathroom.

House Bruce Alexander by Tribe Studio

"The bike pulley system into the void was Tribe's idea, the drive was to keep the walls free," said the studio.

House Bruce Alexander by Tribe Studio

"The client's brief was a low-energy family home with space for their art and bikes that they use daily," they explained.

House Bruce Alexander by Tribe Studio

An open-plan kitchen and dining room surround an enclosed laundry unit on the ground floor, with large, colourful artworks lining the side walls.

House Bruce Alexander by Tribe Studio

A small set of steps leads up to the living room, which opens out onto a wooden deck and spacious outdoor courtyard.

House Bruce Alexander by Tribe Studio

A staircase with wooden treads leads up to the first floor. A bedroom is positioned at each end of the upper floor and connected by a long hallway off to one side, adjacent to a pair of bathrooms.

House Bruce Alexander by Tribe Studio

A trellis was added to the exterior of the new volume to encourage plants to cover the rear facade of the upper level.

Photography is by Katherine Lu.

Here's a short project description from Tribe Studio:


House Bruce Alexander

Designed for an artist, an environmental scientist and their busy young family, House Bruce Alexander explores the poetic potential of the rawest pragmatism.

House Bruce Alexander by Tribe Studio

The family's bikes hang from the ceiling in a double height void, casting a beautiful array of shadows across the space.

House Bruce Alexander by Tribe Studio
Ground floor plan - click for larger image

The lightweight volume added to the Victorian house is covered in flowering vines, protecting the structure from the sun and presenting a frivolous, floral garden face to the street.

House Bruce Alexander by Tribe Studio
First floor plan - click for larger image

Project Name: House Bruce Alexander
Location: Surry Hills, Sydney NSW
Gross Floor Area: 129sqm
Project Team: Hannah Tribe (Design Architect), Miriam Green (Project Architect), Ricci Bloch (Project Team), Ben Wollen
Builder: Truman Building Solutions
Structural Engineers: SDA Structures

  • Hugo

    I had something like this constructed above my desk at architecture school – was great; freed up space in the studio and ensured people wouldn’t hang around too long for fear of the mechanism failing.

  • DJvD

    Nice dripping bikes in your house after a ride through the rain.

  • Rutger

    That’s a cool way of storing clean bikes.

  • Paul O’ Brien

    ‘Explores the poetic potential of the rawest pragmatism.’

    ?

  • James

    So you wheel your wet, dirty bike through the dining room and then hoist it over the living room ready to drip on family members? Hardly pragmatic. Otherwise it is a rather compact and elegant house.

  • mallner

    Looking at the bikes, they seem to be the kind that get cleaned up and dried off after a ride so it’s all good.

  • John Kenner

    If such a void was part of my house I’d use a counterweight pulley instead of a multiple tackle.

  • Patrick

    I’d be surprised if they manage to keep the bikes parallel to the walls otherwise… scratch marks galore!

  • http://intrivia.co.uk/ Robert

    Haha. I don’t know why this is funny but it is. Fancy having to actually look at your bike on the floor somewhere? I don’t know why someone hadn’t thought of this before.

  • andrea

    Important! Never use it after a ride in the rain.

  • Miguel Barroso

    Seriously? All this hype about a set of pulleys that are already commercialised with this intent? (I bought mine – exactly the same ones – in a Lidl store, in Portugal, but they can be found anywhere around the globe! Nowadays, if you want attention just put “bicycle” in it. Having said this, nice house!

  • Jonas

    Other then a nice “readymade installation” this is not really pragmatic and not really an innovative thing. In rural regions this is common for centuries. The Canadian painter Emily Carr did this with her chairs in her atelier/home to gain space and to avoid unwelcome guests sitting down.

    The zoning of the house is also mediocre. Why place the dining table in the middle of circulation? No windows for natural light nearby.