Mirrored cabin installed in Scottish glen
by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler

| 12 comments
 

Architecture students Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler have designed and built a mirrored lookout point in a Scottish national park that both frames and reflects views of the surrounding lochs and glens (+ slideshow).

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler
Photograph by Ross Campbell

Ritchie and Tyler designed The Lookout for a site in the picturesque Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park during the final year of their studies at Glasgow's Strathclyde University.

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler
Photograph by Ross Campbell

To tie in with their thesis based on developing live projects alongside higher education, the pair executed the project as part of a government-funded programme organised by the Scottish Scenic Routes Initiative.

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler
Photograph by Ross Campbell

"The idea was to use a concept design from a first year room-with-a-view project selected by the national park at their final review," Daniel Tyler told Dezeen. "Angus and I took that concept and developed and realised the resulting Lookout. The main concept taken from the first year design was the mirrored material, which the national park was particularity keen on, and framing of three views."

With a budget of just £5,000, the architects designed a wood-framed pavilion with benches built into its different elevations to frame various views of the landscape.

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler

Mirrored stainless steel was laminated to birch ply sheets then fixed to the lookout's exterior surfaces, creating shifting reflections that help the structure blend in with its surroundings.

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler

The main cuboid-shaped volume features a void in its long facade that contains a two-seat bench looking towards a nearby loch, while another opening in the narrow end houses a smaller seat for one.

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler

To reduce costs and minimise waste, the architects used standard panel sizes that determined the overall dimensions of the lookout.

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler

"The design became a cube because of a rational approach to build-ability and the use of standard 2440 x 1220 millimetre sheet sizes," Tyler explained. "We then subtracted volumes from the cube to frame or direct the user's views."

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler

A separate wall parallel to the main structure increases the number of reflective surfaces and multiplies views for visitors standing in the gap between the surfaces.

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler

Views reflected in the mirrored surfaces are framed by the exposed edges of the plywood panels, while a hole inserted in the rear wall of the main seating space frames an alternative scene to the rear of the lookout.

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler

The wooden structure was largely preassembled off-site. It was then lifted onto its shallow foundations by a digger before the metal cladding was applied.

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler

The seating areas and external floor are made from a thermally treated African hardwood called frake, which was planed into square-sectioned battens to form slatted surfaces, in what the architects describe as "a Japanese style".

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler

Other mirrored buildings completed recently include a visitor centre with reflective walls at a French ski resort and a 1950s house renovated by adding funhouse-style mirrors to its gable end.

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler

Photography is by Daniel Tyler, except where stated otherwise.

Here is some more text from the architects:


The Lookout

The Lookout was designed and built by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler as part of their Advanced Architectural Design thesis at Strathclyde University. The project was part of the Scottish Scenic Routes Initiative in conjunction with the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park and funded by the Scottish Government. The project also received sponsorship from MAKlab, Russwood and Gillrick Metalwork.

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler
Axonometric construction diagram - click for larger image

The Lookout sits within the landscape disappearing and reappearing from view as you move towards the object. Two seats, one for two, the other for one, frame views up Loch Voil and Loch Doine whilst a third view can be experienced through the reflections of the single vertical panel. The initial concept of a room with a view was realised over 2 months and built by hand by architecture students Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler.

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler
Plan - click for larger image

The Lookout is a timber frame structure clad in mirrored stainless steel laminated to 12mm birch ply. Standard sheet sizes (1220 x 2440mm) were the kernel of the design as the small budget and concern for minimising wastage were paramount. The result is a 2440 x 2440 cube with volumes carved out to frame views and allow users to sit or stand. The edges of which are exposed, and treated, to frame the object in the landscape. The cladding for the seats is a Frake Hardwood, supplied and sponsored by Russwood, planed to 24x24 mm sections and assembled in a Japanese style.

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler
Section one - click for larger image

Architects : Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler
Location : Balquidder Glen, Scotland
Collaborators: Darran Crawford, Boris Milanov, MAKlab, Russwood, Gillrick Metalwork, Strathcylde University
Client: Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park
Budget: £5000

Lookout for the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park by Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler
Section two - click for larger image
  • Jeroen van Lith

    Looks quite nice but using mirrors in buildings is intellectually such a boring trend.

  • somalife

    Last time I checked three covered seats don’t constitute a cabin.

  • Simon Gerssen

    Those fancy mirrored constructions are a disaster for birds.

  • MelissaSterry

    Ecologically inappropriate, engaging unimaginative design, and generally bringing nothing new to the architecture discipline. As Simon Gerssen points out below, mirrored structures such as these are disastrous for birds. It’s disappointing that the collective parties had not the foresight to come up with something more inspired, informed and imaginative.

    • Christoffer Justusson

      It depends. If the mirrors have been treated with a UV-filter, a plastic coating which could be applied and almost be invisible without any seams, this structure will be visible for birds as well.

      A good example of this is the Tree-Hotel in Sweden by Tham & Videgård, which used this principle.
      Could be a disaster, but perhaps the architects have thought about this.

  • Malcolm Cullen

    Is it plumbed in yet?

  • Z-dog

    10/10. This is some great work. Material investigation, design proposal, construction and execution.

    I think the commenters here are forgetting that this is still a student project – it’s about their development as students.

    The article says that it is part of the “Scottish Scenic Routes Initiative” – it would be great if architects got behind these proposals and exclaimed “please, sir, I want some more.”

    PS to Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler – welcome to the internet.

  • http://www.fineshmaker.com Amit

    Extremely creative! Well done guys.

  • Z-dog

    Look at the photos – they didn’t just design it.

    Many people will tell you that they could design a mirrored box. Very few people have actually completed and built it.

    If these were drawings of a mirrored box proposal, I wouldn’t have been interested. Instead, it’s a much fuller project taken to the harshest scale – 1:1.

  • nunn

    Nice bench. Would be good to see some shots of the exterior though?

  • Concerned Citizen

    Let’s see here. A huge expanse of incredible natural beauty, and the only thing they can think of is to create a box to minimise the view? This just doesn’t make sense.

  • http://www.theidlearchitect.com/ The Idle Architect

    I’m pretending it’s an elevator lobby to a secret fortress below.