David Shrigley creates tableware range
for London restaurant Sketch

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British artist David Shrigley has designed his first ceramics collection for the Gallery at Sketch on London's Conduit Street, as part of the restaurant's programme of artist collaborations (+ slideshow).

Sketch crockery by David Shrigley

Shrigley has patterned white ceramic tableware with satirical drawings, patterns and text, which will be used to serve chef Pierre Gagnaire's new summer afternoon tea menu at Sketch.

Sketch crockery by David Shrigley


Related story: Sketch by Martin Creed


"I'm delighted to be working with Sketch on such an exciting commission," said Shrigley. "It will be the first artwork that I have made that can go in the dishwasher. It will be very clean artwork."

Sketch crockery by David Shrigley

The range includes plates that illustrate the restaurant's location and an assortment of bespoke afternoon tea accessories.

Sketch crockery by David Shrigley

His condiment pots are labelled "dust", "nothing" and "dirt" instead of revealing their contents.

Sketch crockery by David Shrigley

The ceramics are manufactured by British brand Caverswall exclusively for Sketch.

Sketch crockery by David Shrigley

Shrigley has also created 239 new artworks, which will line the wall of the restaurant interior designed by Paris architect India Mahdavi.

Sketch crockery by David Shrigley

The drawings, featuring everything from cucumbers and poodles to artists and spacemen, are intended to provide conversation starters for diners.

Sketch crockery by David Shrigley

Currently commissioned to create the 2016 installation for the Fourth Plinth in London's Trafalgar Square, David Shrigley is best known for cartoon-like drawings that make sarcastic comments on everyday situations and human interactions.

Sketch crockery by David Shrigley

This project was jointly curated by RSC Contemporary Ltd and Christopher Huynh as part of a series of artist restaurants at Sketch, aiming to create interactions with art in public spaces.

It follows Turner Prize-winning artist Martin Creed's Sketch restaurant commission from 2012, which included a zig-zag floor installation made from 96 different types of marble.