Bestor Architecture uses primary colours
in Beats by Dre headquarters

| 6 comments
 

Los Angeles studio Bestor Architecture has completed a colourful new headquarters for Beats by Dre, following Apple's $3 billion acquisition of the headphones company (+ slideshow).

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture

The 105,000-square-foot Beats By Dre offices in Culver City, west Los Angeles, was designed for the company originally founded by music producers Dr Dre and Jimmy Iovine and taken over by Apple in May.

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture



Bestor Architecture wanted to create a sophisticated working environment for Beats' 650 employees, rather than the "adolescent-like interior that is prevalent in Silicon Valley".

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture

"We steered clear of the 'fun and games' aesthetic that has been recently spoofed on HBO – the whole dot com deal," founder Barbara Bestor told Dezeen. "I think office environments, Silicon Valley or not, can often be quite generic or overly branded and we really wanted to make a campus that felt diverse spatially."

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture

The studio collaborated with workplace consultants Loescher Meachem Architects to plan the space, organised so natural light flows through the building via skylights and atriums.

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture

"The design reflects the varied nature of [the company's] work from software to hardware, balancing open-plan zones with ample collaborative co-working zones woven through the core of the building," said the architects.

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture

Walls and structural supports are painted bright blue in one of two double-height atriums, used as a casual workspace.

Openings to other rooms on both levels are set back within faceted recesses, while clerestory windows spread light across angled sections of ceiling.

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture

Corridors leading from this area are completely red and feature cushioned seats within niches in the walls.

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture

In the centre of the building, a wooden staircase is positioned beside a long white wall opposite the cafe.

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture

"We used the wood to bring a sense of warmth to the space," project designer Daniel Rabin told Dezeen. "There is a certain tactility that comes from using natural materials that brings a sense of comfort to the environment. We wanted people to feel at home in the office in order to use the space as best as possible."

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture

A walkway bridges the space above the eatery, where black and white diagonal striped tiles cover sections of floor and the sides of the counter. Another staircase is lined on all sides with golden mirrored panels, which reflect the wooden treads.

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture

A giant aerial photograph of LA by Iwan Baan covers a wall in one of the larger spaces, while smaller versions of his cityscapes are mounted in conference rooms upstairs.

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture

Informal work bars are located outside these rooms, while six "project zones" across the building include floor-to-ceiling whiteboards.

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture

Scandinavian furniture like the Copenhague collection by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Hay furnishes the courtyards, public areas and listening bars, while pieces by Muuto are scattered across the headquarters.

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture

"We used furniture lines from young, up-and-coming designers," said Rabin. "Lines that were not widely used in the US, but had some traction in Europe."

Beats by Dre headquarters by Bestor Architecture

Photography is by Jasper Sanidad.

  • pierre

    Finally, a corporate building that doesn’t look artificially friendly.

  • Citizen

    Why do these stories about office spaces never show the actual offices? Where do people sit to work? Cubicles? Open spaces? Rooms? All we see is a bunch of cool lobbies, conference rooms and cafeterias. These are not the places where workers spend most of their time.

  • iag

    Maybe they work in those places you mentioned. Just a thought.

  • vw

    The photos of this projects hurts my eyes… I can’t help but think that the retina stimulation would only burn more in person.

  • Kris

    This is pretty terrible.

  • James Hunt

    This looks like a sitcom vision of ‘creative headquarters’.