Fibre-cement tiles create a latticed facade
for Leeuw House by NU Architectuuratelier

| 4 comments
 

Fibre-cement tiles have been used to create a latticed surface on the facade and roof of this house by Belgian studio NU Architectuuratelier (+ slideshow).

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier

Leeuw House was designed by NU Architectuuratelier for a young couple on vacant land in the town of Sint-Pieters-Leeuw, near Brussels. Its shape mimics the area's more traditional brick buildings, but its cladding distinguishes it as a modern addition.


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"The slates are quite cheap, and we used them uncoated, which has a nice materiality. They are not as clean as the coated ones – there's a variation in colour," the architects told Dezeen.

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier

The couple asked for an energy-efficient house, so NU architectuuratelier designed it to meet Passive House standards in collaboration with Ghent-based office Robuust, who did the engineering. It is built with an airtight structure that requires little additional heating or cooling.

"The house has underfloor heating, but it hasn't been used yet. The building requires almost no energy for heating," said the architects.

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier

The north facade of the three-storey house is relatively blank, while the south and west facades are almost entirely glazed in order to maximise light and warmth from the sun. This orientation also shifts views towards adjacent fields, and away from neighbouring buildings.

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier

Multiple entrances and exits have been designed to give the house a more dynamic relationship with its location. These include a ramp from the street to the side of the house, doors to the terrace at the back, and external stairs from the first floor down to the surrounding land.

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier

Green doors and shutters have been added to enliven the exterior.

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier

"We liked the idea of adding colour to this grey volume. The colour was chosen together with the client," said the architects.

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier

The house has a garage in the basement and three bedrooms on the first floor. A dining room, kitchen, living room and study have been arranged on half levels between the ground floor and first floor.

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier

A section of the living room flooring has been cantilevered out into the kitchen to provide a cooking surface.

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier

Rather than design a separate circulation area in the house, the architects have created a route through the different open-plan spaces using metal stairs.

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier

"The house is designed like a spiral internal landscape with alternating views to the exterior landscape," the architects explained. "This spiral is made up of spaces with their own quality, but with open relations to each other. As you ascend, the spaces become more private."

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier

Concrete flooring has been used throughout, chosen for its natural ability to soak up heat during the day and release it slowly later, as temperatures drop.

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier

Birch plywood has been used for the kitchen and storage cabinets, and the metal floor plate supporting the top level has been left exposed to double as the ceiling for the ground floor.

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier

"The client wanted an industrial look, so the structure remains visible," said the architects.

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier

Photography is by Stijn Bollaert.

Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier
Site plan – click for larger image
Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier
Lower ground floor plan – click for larger image
Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier
First floor plan – click for larger image
Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier
Roof plan – click for larger image
Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier
Section – click for larger image
Leeuw by NU architectuuratelier
Elevation – click for larger image
  • Lee

    While I think it has a great spacial arrangement inside I don’t know understand this forced brutality on the outside. Also, those solid doors and windows don’t make much sense from the inside either. Sorry for being so critical.

    • Guest

      Sorry for being so critical? Why? That’s an absolutely shocking shade of green.

  • G’s Little Art Dept

    The cantilevered living room floor into the kitchen is genius.

    • Jimmy

      Sorry dude, but it has been done before by numerous Japanese architects.

      @lee The solid doors and windows are indeed pointless. The interior is, for my taste, much too cold and rigid. The exterior is, in my humble opinion, just plain awful. It’s another typical example of an architect that cared more about magazine exposure than context.