Canadian lodge by Chevalier Morales
references Alpine chalets

| 4 comments
 

Canadian studio Chevalier Morales Architectes has reinterpreted the traditional Swiss chalet to create a top-heavy timber house in the mountain landscape of eastern Quebec (+ slideshow).

Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes

Named Residence Roy-Lawrence, the single-storey property was designed by Chevalier Morales Architectes to provide a family home on a hillside just outside the village of Sutton.



The surrounding landscape was once the estate of a Swiss immigrant family, so an assortment of Alpine-inspired chalets can be found within the vicinity of the site.

Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes

"Naturally, the icon of the Swiss chalet, somehow representing a lost ideal of country living, became the starting point for the conceptual development of the residence," said the architects.

Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes

The tripartite volume of the chalets was reinterpreted to create a modern structure. The typical stone base was replaced with a concrete plinth, while the iconic pitched roof becomes an overhanging boxy volume.

Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes

"Aiming to reinterpret these traditional elements in a contemporary manner, the final version of residence could be read as a composition of three distinct formal elements stacked on top of each other," said the team.

Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes

A wooden post-and-beam framework gives the house its structure, with outer walls clad in charred black timber. These stand in contrast to the roof above, where wooden panels are either left natural or stained brown.

Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes

"From the beginning, the objectives were to create a residence that seems to emerge from the ground and that was built with materials found on site," said the architects.

Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes

The house is orientated on a south-east to north-west axis, lining up with the topography while also maximising views across the landscape and shielding outdoor areas from the prevailing wind.

Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes

The main entrance is located on the north-east elevation, beside a small courtyard recessed into the wall.

Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes

This leads through to the centre of the building, where a family living room, dining area and kitchen are all located. Fronted by a south-west-facing wall of glazing, these spaces boast a panoramic view of the scenic landscape.

Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes

Bedrooms are located on opposite ends of the house, while a terrace in the southern corner offers a second dining area that can be exposed to the elements during the warmer summer months.

Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes

"Like a bite taken in the layout, the totally glazed interior courtyard allows transversal transparency, giving the owners the opportunity to experience a privileged contact with the mountain," added the team.

Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes

Photography is by the architects, courtesy of v2com.


Project credits:

Client's name: Jean Roy, Marthe Lawrence
Architect: Chevalier Morales Architectes
Project leaders: S Chevalier, S Morales
Design team: S Chevalier, S Morales, J Rondeau, P Littée
Engineer: Structure Pierre Gosselin
Landscape architect: client
Contractor: self-construction/client

Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes
Site plan – click for larger image
Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes
Floor plan – click for larger image
Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes
Cross section one – click for larger image
Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes
Cross section two – click for larger image
Residence Roy-Lawrence by Chevalier Morales Architectes
Long section – click for larger image
  • Concerned Citizen

    I like the house, but “alpine chalet” is just not a phrase that crosses my mind when I look at it.

  • Guest

    From the cross sections it looks suspiciously like they could have had about 25% more glass without that over-scaled roof. I know what I’d rather have had.

    • C4Design

      Snow loads! I hope it’s built well. I have to say I’d be concerned with the snow weight, the subsequent ice dams and melting on essentially a flat roof. There’s a reason for significantly sloped roofs in mountain climates. Looks cool, but…

      • Salut

        Don’t worry about snow weight, Canadians are used to dealing with it.