Wide sloping roof shelters plywood-filled house in Kobe by Tomohiro Hata

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Japanese architect Tomohiro Hata gave this ridged metal residence in Kobe a staggered plywood interior and a broad pitched roof that follows the sloping terrain (+ slideshow).

Re Slope House by Tomohiro Hata AAA

The local architect and his firm designed the family home for a plot in Suwayama Park, a residential area set on a hillside above the city.

Re Slope House by Tomohiro Hata AAA

A step had been cut into the slope to form footings for a row of gabled houses, but the architects wanted to design a new residence that would restore the natural slope.

Re Slope House by Tomohiro Hata AAA

An existing house that protruded from the lowest part of the site was demolished to make room for the new residence.

The house inherits its foundations from its predecessor. It is set below a wide sloping roof that is intended to mimic the slope of the terrain. The project is named Re-slope House to reference this.

Re Slope House by Tomohiro Hata AAA

"This slope had been changed to [form a] landscape that lined up houses forcibly to compete for light and wind," said the studio.



"We explored restoring the slope and the way of architecture nestling on the slope as having the manners by which other animals establish a home in a slope."

Re Slope House by Tomohiro Hata AAA

The residence appears as a windowless, metal-clad box from the street, with just a sliver of a terrace visible along the roofline. But an abundance of skylights and windows are located within the sloping roof to the rear.

Re Slope House by Tomohiro Hata AAA

Here, a scaffolding-like arrangement of balustrades and steps constructed over the old foundations provides a terraced garden overlooking the city, protected by the overhanging roof.

Re Slope House by Tomohiro Hata AAA

The interior is divided into storeya by a series of plywood platforms linked by boxy stairs. The studio employed a similar wood-lined aesthetic for a project in Kyoto containing a house-shaped volume.

Re Slope House by Tomohiro Hata AAA

The living area is set at the lowest part of the site and connects to the garden, while a bedroom and bathroom are set on a split-level above. A further flight of steps provides access to the street-facing terrace, which also acts as a clerestory window for the spaces below.

Re Slope House by Tomohiro Hata AAA

"While taking the existing foundation, we designed the configuration of living space like a stage of stairs to restore the original slope," said the architects, "and floated the roof on top, like tracing the ridge line of the original slope. Thus, the slope which had been severed is restored again."

Re Slope House by Tomohiro Hata AAA
Landscape plan – click for larger image
Re Slope House by Tomohiro Hata AAA
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
Re Slope House by Tomohiro Hata AAA
First floor plan – click for larger image
Re Slope House by Tomohiro Hata AAA
Roof plan – click for larger image
  • Leo

    I like the roof and all the light coming from it a lot. The plywood inside makes it look cheap. I hope this plywood fad disappears soon.

  • Durgen Jensen

    Would it be so wrong to paint the plywood?

  • No kids allowed.

  • Meme

    I feel it’s dangerous for kids. Why take unnecessary risks? What if a child breaks his neck?
    But I like the plywood and interior terrain.

  • Vincent van den Aardwech

    I like the plywood look. It reminds me of the CLT house from Grand Designs. Because of the overwelming effect all that wood has, it has a warm feeling about it. I also find they should learn from their safety features.
    https://youtu.be/pXVyOFbCa6c

  • Cooking The Books

    Love it. I do wonder if my plywood-interior fetish comes from a childhood spent in skate parks though. I spoke to a carpenter about doing a plywood interior for a room in my loft and he said it would be cheaper to line it in gold. Exaggerating, obviously, but made me wonder if plywood really was a cheap architects’ trick like some would have you believe.