Thomas Schnur's wire Grid functions as a storage system

Milan 2016: German designer Thomas Schnur has designed a gridded storage system than can be used to display plants, hang up clothes, or as a framework for shelves (+ slideshow).

Grid clothing rail by Thomas Schnur for Milan 2016

Schnur based his Grid project on retail storage solutions and a set of tiles from Piero Lissoni's Patchwork collection for Italian brand Cotto, which features a series of criss-crossing lines.

Grid clothing rail by Thomas Schnur for Milan 2016

Hoping to "translate these two-dimensional lines into a three-dimensional object", the designer – whose previous projects include a set of squishy lamps and a wooden bench with logs instead of legs – used a wire grid supported by a frame of metal tubes.

"Grid is mainly inspired by a wire grid, which we know from displays for shops and stores," Schnur told Dezeen. "I transferred this wire grid into an object for home use because I thought it could be also practical at home."

Grid clothing rail by Thomas Schnur for Milan 2016

"To use a metal tube for the frame of the wire grid was very logical step for me as I wanted the object to not be expensive to produce," he continued. "The use of metal also allows a demountable structure for sending it flat-packed."

Grid clothing rail by Thomas Schnur for Milan 2016

Sydney design studio Sibling installed a similar grid system to define the working areas within an Australian office, whilst Royal College of Art graduate Ying Chang used the same approach to create a modular steel mesh table.

Grid clothing rail by Thomas Schnur for Milan 2016

Schnur was among seven designers and architects presenting projects related to Lissoni's Patchwork collection as part of the Another Perspective 4 exhibition, which took place in the Ventura Lambrate district during Milan design week.

Grid clothing rail by Thomas Schnur for Milan 2016

Other designs that were on show during Milan design week included a collection of "intentionally boring" office furniture, a series of 50 chairs based on manga-style comic books and a range of splotchy metal stools.