Daan Roosegaarde creates illusion of depth in cloudy Beyond installation

Daan Roosegaarde creates illusion of depth in cloud-filled Beyond installation

Dutch designer Daan Roosegaarde has covered a wall at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport in a realistic, cloud-studded sky (+ movie). 

Titled Beyond, the 100-metre-long piece was created with a printing technology that uses lenses to give a sense of depth and movement when seen from different angles.

Daan Roosegaarde covers airport wall in clouds for Beyond installation

Despite being only 10 centimetres thick, the artwork creates a convincing impression of the sky as it would appear through a window. LEDs embedded in the wall enhance this effect.

"In the midst of Schiphol Airport's bustle, Beyond creates a place of wonder and identity – our Dutch light and sky," said the designer, who recently completed a laser light installation in the Netherlands.

Daan Roosegaarde covers airport wall in clouds for Beyond installation

"Looking at the clouds, people start dreaming again and find their own stories in them," he added.

Roosegaarde looked at the work of 17th-century Dutch painters for inspiration, particularly the interest they took in depicting the landscape.

Daan Roosegaarde covers airport wall in clouds for Beyond installation

To reflect this, different kinds of clouds are arranged along the wall – with more golden clouds included at the centre to reflect the colour often used by the Dutch Masters.

The piece is located at Departure Hall 3 in Schiphol Airport, which also recently housed an artwork by Dutch designer Maarten Baas.

His Real Time Schiphol installation is a giant timepiece that replaces the typical clock face with a film showing Baas drawing and redrawing clock hands with a roller and paint.

Daan Roosegaarde covers airport wall in clouds for Beyond installation

Roosegaarde has completed several other projects in the Netherlands, including installing a giant smog vacuum cleaner in Rotterdam to improve the city's air quality, and a lighting installation that mimics the northern lights.

He referred back to the work of Vincent van Gogh to design a cycle path for the Dutch town of Nuenen, creating lighting patterns based on the artist's Starry Night painting.


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