Dezeen's top 10 installations of 2018

Dezeen's top 10 installations of 2018

Installations were bigger than ever in 2018, from a six-metre-high Trump blimp to an inflatable mirrored sphere at Burning Man festival. For our review of 2018, social media editor Sabina Sohail selects her top 10.


Dezeen's top 10 installations of 2018: Moving Creates Vorticles Create Movement, Australia, by TeamLab

Trump Baby, UK

A six-metre-high blimp picturing Donald Trump as a cartoon baby took flight over London's Houses of Parliament during the American president's visit to the UK in July.

The comical project was created as a symbol of the public's opposition to the visit, and was approved by London mayor Sadiq Khan.

Find out more about Trump Baby ›


Dezeen's top 10 installations of 2018: The London Mastaba, UK, by Christo

The London Mastaba, UK, by Christo

This summer saw Christo install a 20-metre-high floating sculpture on London's Serpentine Lake, in tribute to the vision he shared with his late wife Jeanne-Claude to make art free

Comprising 7,506 painted barrels, the structure was entirely self funded. It was on show for three months.

Find out more about The London Mastaba ›


Dezeen's top 10 installations of 2018: The Orb, USA, by BIG

The Orb, USA, by BIG

BIG architects Bjarke Ingels and Jakob Lange used a $50,000 (£37,907) crowdfunding campaign on website Indiegogo to help them take their "giant reflective art piece" The Orb to the annual Burning Man festival.

Images later emerged by photographer Alex Medina showing that the structure, although certainly grand in scale, was not as reflective as originally planned, thanks to the volume of dust moving across the desert site.

Find out more about The Orb ›


Dezeen's top 10 installations of 2018: Moving Creates Vorticles Create Movement, Australia, by TeamLab

Moving Creates Vorticles Create Movement, Australia, by TeamLab

Japanese art collective TeamLab made the headlines several time this year, thanks to a series of impressive digital installations. Among the most spectacular was this project that debuted at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne.

Designed to look like a whirlpools, it was created from "immersive and responsive" lights that projected moving lines on the floor. This were reflected infinitely by mirrors on the walls.

Find out more about Teamlab's installation ›


Dezeen's top 10 installations of 2018: Zero Waste Bistro, USA, by Finnish Cultural Institute

Zero Waste Bistro, USA, by Finnish Cultural Institute

The first zero-waste restaurant in the Nordic region was transported to New York for the WantedDesign exhibition.

Created with recycled food packaging, the temporary dining space composted all of its waste. Its aim was to promote the circular economy to designers, engineers and architects.

Find out more about the Zero Waste Bistro ›


Dezeen's top 10 installations of 2018: The Color Factory, USA

The Color Factory, USA

Instagram sensation The Color Factory spent the first part of 2018 in San Francisco, before moving to New York City.

The interactive installation included a myriad of tonal installations to take photos in, including a giant blue ball pit and a disco room.

Find out more about The Color Factory ›


Dezeen's top 10 installations of 2018: Grasslands Repair, Italy, by Baracco+Wright Architects

Grasslands Repair, Italy, by Baracco+Wright Architects with Linda Tegg

One of the most photo-friendly installations at this year's Venice Architecture Biennale was created inside the Australian Pavilion.

More then 10,000 plants, including 65 different grassland species, were used to recreate the indigenous grassland of southeast Victoria in the space. The curators hoped to highlight how this landscape is being gradually lost.

Find out more about Grasslands Repair ›


Dezeen's top 10 installations of 2018: Colour of Time, Japan by Emmanuelle Moureaux

Colour of Time, Japan by Emmanuelle Moureaux

Artist Emmanuelle Moureaux used over 100,000 paper number cut-outs to create this multihued installation, designed to visualise the passing of time.

Shown at the Toyama Prefectural Museum of Art and Design, it formed part of a series of exhibitions exploring the different functions of materials.

Find out more about the Colour of Time ›


Dezeen's top 10 installations of 2018: Deltawerk, Netherlands, by RAAAF and Atelier de Lyon

Deltawerk, Netherlands, by RAAAF and Atelier de Lyon

Billed as the largest monument in the Netherlands, this colossal artwork was created from the disused Delta Flume in Waterloopbos, a basin built in the 1970s to test defences against rising sea levels.

Dutch studios RAAAF and Atelier de Lyon cut the old structure into pieces and created a flood around them.

Find out more about Deltawerk ›


Dezeen's top 10 installations of 2018: Over Flow, Portugal, by Tadashi Kawamata

Over Flow, Portugal, by Tadashi Kawamata

Paris-based artist Tadashi Kawamata wanted to help people understand the impact of pollution on the environment with installation of ocean plastic in Lisbon's MAAT museum.

The installation comprised both plastic waste and boats, found on Portugal's coastline by the volunteer clean-up group, Brigada do Mar.

Find out more about Over Flow ›