Sugamo Shinkin Bank, Ekoda
by Emmanuelle Moureaux

| 4 comments
 

Designer Emmanuelle Moureaux has brought her trademark colour spectrum to a fourth bank branch in Japan by surrounding the facade with brightly coloured sticks (+ slideshow).

Sugamo Shinkin Bank Ekoda by Emmanuelle Moureaux

The Tokyo-based French designer wanted to visually tie together the interior of the bank and the street beyond, so she added 29 vertical rods outside the glass facade and 19 behind it.

Sugamo Shinkin Bank Ekoda by Emmanuelle Moureaux

"This rainbow shower returns colours and some room for playfulness back to the town," explains the design team.

Sugamo Shinkin Bank Ekoda by Emmanuelle Moureaux

When the bank is open, the glass panels pivot open to let visitors through to an indoor terrace filled with an assortment of colourful chairs.

Sugamo Shinkin Bank Ekoda by Emmanuelle Moureaux

Two glazed courtyards separate this informal meeting area from the rest of the bank. Each one appears as a glass vitrine and contains bamboo trees intended to reflect the verticality of the sticks.

Sugamo Shinkin Bank Ekoda by Emmanuelle Moureaux

Located in Ekoda, near Tokyo, this is the fourth Sugamo Shinkin Bank designed by Emmanuelle Moureaux. Others include a Tokyo branch with horizontal bands of colour and a Tokiwadai branch with colourful window recesses. See more banks on Dezeen.

Sugamo Shinkin Bank Ekoda by Emmanuelle Moureaux

Moureaux has also used coloured sticks in furniture design and previously launched the Stick Chair with narrow rods for legs. See more design by Emmanuelle Moureaux.

Sugamo Shinkin Bank Ekoda by Emmanuelle Moureaux

Here's a project description from the design team:


Sugamo Shinkin Bank / Ekoda branch

Concept: rainbow shower

Sugamo Shinkin Bank is a credit union that strives to provide first-rate hospitality to its customers in accordance with its motto: "we take pleasure in serving happy customers". Ekoda is the forth branch (third for designing the entire building) Emmanuelle Moureaux designs, responding to the client's expectation: "creating a bank the customers feel happy to visit".

Sugamo Shinkin Bank, Ekoda by Emmanuelle Moureaux

The site is located in a commercial district with many stores. The site's closeness to the town's activities – also the heavy traffic and narrow sidewalk – inspired the architect to express this proximity in the building by merging the exterior and interior.

Sugamo Shinkin Bank, Ekoda by Emmanuelle Moureaux

The building is offset approximately two metres from the property line, and the timber-decked peripheral space is filled with colourful 9 metre-tall sticks. These 29 exterior sticks, reflected on the transparent glazed façade, mix naturally with the 19 interior sticks placed randomly inside the building. This rainbow shower returns colours and some room for playfulness back to the town.

Sugamo Shinkin Bank, Ekoda by Emmanuelle Moureaux

Entering the building, the visitors would notice that they are still in an exterior courtyard leading to the bank's interior. Here also, the inside and outside are integrated. Walking around the glazed courtyard inside, there is a cafe-like open space filled with natural light. The bamboos in the courtyard extend skyward in concert with the colourful sticks.

Sugamo Shinkin Bank, Ekoda by Emmanuelle Moureaux

The exterior deck space, interior open space, exterior courtyard, and the interior teller counters compose four layers of spaces. The layers are reflected on the glazing, and, combined with complex shadows, they create depth in the space.

Sugamo Shinkin Bank Ekoda by Emmanuelle Moureaux

Above: site plan - click for larger image

  • dUMB

    Art and architecture are effortlessly combined. It’s fun, colourful and just a bit sexy – well done Emmanuelle Moureaux!

  • PTimble

    In Tokyo people cycle on the sidewalks, which makes this design far from cyclist-friendly.

    • jon

      As someone who has to dodge those cyclists on a daily basis, I would happily cover the sidewalks in poles. And nails.

    • Jetpackosaur

      In Tokyo, they also have asphalt sidewalks. What you’re looking at are the coloured rods on the timber walkway within the site boundary. Your cyclist friends will be fine.