Jeju Ball by Kengo Kuma
and Associates

| 7 comments
 

Volcanic rubble is scattered across the curved rooftops of these villas by Japanese architect Kengo Kuma on Jeju Island, South Korea (+ slideshow).

Jeju Ball by Kengo Kuma and Associates

The "art villas" form Block D of the Lotte Jeju Resort, a development of houses designed by different architects, including Dominique Perrault, Yi Jongho and Seung H-Sang.

Jeju Ball by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Kengo Kuma used locally sourced volcanic rocks for the exterior of his buildings, as a reference to over 300 volcanoes and lava cones, called oreums, that are scattered across the island.

Jeju Ball by Kengo Kuma and Associates

"When I visited Jeju Island for the first time, I was so much inspired by this dark, porous volcanic rock and wanted to translate its soft and round touch into architecture," says Kuma. "As the result, the entire house emerged as a round black stone."

Jeju Ball by Kengo Kuma and Associates

A neat lattice of timber creates the arching profiles of the rooftops. The volcanic rubble is spread thinly over the surfaces, stretching down to the ground at intervals and receding to make way for rectangular skylights over various rooms.

Jeju Ball by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Kuma explains: "Our intention was [for] the light to come through the black pebbles. Light highlights the texture of the stone, and the ambiguous roof edge can connect the roof with the ground."

Jeju Ball by Kengo Kuma and Associates

The villas are available to rent or buy and are available in two sizes - 210 and 245 square metres.

Jeju Ball by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Jeju Ball is one of several projects completed by Kengo Kuma recently, following an art and culture centre with a chequered timber facade and a bamboo-clad hotel. See more architecture by Kengo Kuma.

Jeju Ball by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Other buildings we've featured on Jeju Island include a an art museum surrounded by a pool of water and a headquarters building for a Korean internet company.

Here's the complete statement from Kengo Kuma:


Jeju Ball

When I visited Jeju Island for the first time, I was so much inspired by this dark, porous volcanic rock and wanted to translate its soft and round touch into architecture. As the result, the entire house emerged as a round black stone. From distance, the house appears like a single pebble and when you are close, you notice that many parts of the house are of the black stone.

Jeju Ball by Kengo Kuma and Associates
Type A ground floor plan - click for larger image

The stone eaves should be the principal detail for this house. Our intention was the light to come through the black pebbles. Light highlights the texture of the stone, and the ambiguous roof edge can connect the roof with the ground. The detail, placing the black stone on a steel mesh, enabled us to realise such vague and subtle edge.

Jeju Ball by Kengo Kuma and Associates
Type A cross section - click for larger image

What determines the landscape of Jeju is this blackness and porousness. So we sublimated its feel in a scale of a house.

Jeju Ball by Kengo Kuma and Associates
Type B ground floor plan - click for larger image
Jeju Ball by Kengo Kuma and Associates
Type B first floor plan - click for larger image
Jeju Ball by Kengo Kuma and Associates
Type B cross section - click for larger image
  • Munchman

    Quite honestly, the rubble doesn't do it for me. Big fan of Kengo Kuma's work but this lacks the usual elegance for me. Interiors are fantastic though.

  • SBG

    So what temperature could it be inside, being sheltered by many black pebbles? :D

  • oli

    I can’t get over how nice the interior appears to be, compared to the monstrosity of that rubble roof. Looks like a proper swish building had another collapse on top of it.

  • Paul

    I really love the roof (and the interiors), it reminds me of the César Manrique work in Lanzarote which I also like. Beautiful project that makes use of an interesting local material – soft, porous volcanic rock – in an interesting way.

  • m'fi

    And insulation? Kengo: -1 point…

  • zizi

    Hideous houses, at least they’re partially hidden under that nice rubble.

  • http://www.fabseoul.com FabSeoul

    The rubbles on the roof are from the local landscape as it is a volcanic island.