Kotaro Horiuchi creates human Whac-A-Mole
with membrane installation

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Japanese architect Kotaro Horiuchi stretched two punctured membranes across a gallery in Nagoya so visitors could pop up through the holes like moles in a popular arcade game (+ slideshow).

Fusionner by Kotaro Horiuchi

For his Fusionner 1.0 installation, Kotaro Horiuchi created a playful environment inside a room at the Gallery White Cube in Nagoya.



The two horizontal angled fabric membranes were secured to the walls at various points, dividing the space vertically into three sections.

Fusionner by Kotaro Horiuchi

"Putting up membranes with an angle enabled the creation of holes at different heights," said Horiuchi. "Visitors can move from hole to hole to encounter new people or objects, gather in one hole or stand in another one for a while."

Fusionner by Kotaro Horiuchi

Visitors crawled under the lowest layer and could stand up through the holes in the surfaces along the way, similar to plastic moles in the Whac-A-Mole arcade game that players have to hit with a hammer when they pop up.

The holes were created to encourage interaction across the room but restrict the horizontal movement of visitors.

Fusionner by Kotaro Horiuchi

"It was a space that brings people together to communicate," said the architect.

Fusionner by Kotaro Horiuchi

Colourful lighting filtered through the layers and reflected off more white fabric draped across the ceiling.

Fusionner by Kotaro Horiuchi

The space was also used by students at Nagoya University to present architectural drawings and models.

Fusionner by Kotaro Horiuchi

Fusionner 1.0 was presented in association with the Design Space Association from 20 to 30 March.

Fusionner by Kotaro Horiuchi

Installations that physically engage visitors remain popular with museums and galleries.

Fusionner by Kotaro Horiuchi

Other examples from this year include BIG's wooden maze at the National Building Museum in Washington DC and a kinetic wall that responds to hand gestures.

Fusionner by Kotaro Horiuchi
Floor plan and section – click for larger image
  • Design crimes

    “It was a space that brings people together to communicate,” said the architect. Oh, he must mean like a kitchen or a coffee shop. A stretch indeed.