Lina Patsiou's leather Sunclocks
get tanned in the solarium

| 6 comments
 

These clocks by London designer Lina Patsiou have spent time on the sun beds to tan patterns onto their leathery faces (+ slideshow).

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

While she was growing up, Greece-born Lina Patsiou noticed that her leather sandals turned darker after wearing them in the sun all summer, just like human skin.



Now based in a part of Europe with less reliable weather, Patsiou wanted to see if she could created a similar effect via an artificial process.

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

"I was in London when I was developing the project and waiting for a sunny day to do some experimenting did not seem like a good idea," Patsiou told Dezeen. "So I thought to try with a solarium, even though I didn't really expect it to work. But it did!"

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

The Sunclocks collection features three different tanned designs. "Each pattern is inspired by a different manifestation of sunlight," said Patsiou.

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

The first is split down the middle, with one paler and one darker side. Another design is divided into four segments at the two, four, eight and 10 o'clock positions, with a more tanned section at the top and getting lighter towards the bottom.

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

"If you read it as AM, then the darkest parts of the dial are the ones with the most intense sun exposure," said Patsiou. "If you read it as PM, then the darkest parts are the deepest night."

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

The third features diagonal stripes in different shades, created to echo beams of sunlight filtering through the clouds.

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

To create the clocks she worked with a craftsman who cuts the cow's leather, which was produced in Italy and finished in Greece.

The leather is mounted onto computer numerically controlled (CNC) cut plywood circles, before being placed on the tanning bed.

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

Panels are placed over the sections of the dials to vary the amount of exposure the different areas receive.

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

"I ran my first experiments with a small lamp for facial tanning, but now I have my own solarium in my studio in Hackney," Patsiou said.

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

Before finalising the designs, she created samples to test the different shades that could be achieved with the technique.

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

"Obviously the melanin of the leather is limited, so there is a saturation point for the tanning," she explained.

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

Although the project focuses on the relationship between time and the sun, Patsiou told Dezeen that there is an element to the concept that carries a message about overexposure to UV radiation.

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

"There is definitely a side of the project that contemplates the use of the sun as a medium for beatification," she said. "Those tan lines on the clocks' dials are the product's sole decoration and they are created with a tool for artificial cosmetic tanning."

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

"If you combine that process with the fact that this material comes from a dead animal, yet tans to such dramatic effect, it's really rather unsettling," Patsiou added.

Sunclock Collection by Lina Patsiou

  • Vicki

    Very clever! Nice to see new production approaches emerging.

  • kcip

    “The fact that this material comes from a dead animal, yet tans to such dramatic effect, it’s really rather unsettling”.

    Wood does the same when exposed to UV light. And many other materials. The fact alone that this designer just discovered it doesn’t make it into a valid project. Is there a particular reason why the face of a clock needs to be covered in leather, and this leather tanned with UV light? Does it look different from being just stained?

    I am sure something interesting could be done with this process, but at this stage it seems like a vague and random experiment to me.

    • I

      It’s like conceptual art. You have to be aware of the processes and ideas behind it to understand it.
      For me it works.

  • http://www.yiannisghikas.com Yiannis Ghikas

    Not such an innovative technique. This was made in 2010 by Greece Is For Lovers. By the way Patsiou has also interned for this design studio.

    http://greeceisforlovers.com/all-work/tan-lines

    http://www.coolhunting.com/design/tan-lines.php

  • Yuri Kumada

    Oops! Greece Is For Lovers is going to be pretty unhappy about this one!

  • Yoon C

    Pretty cool idea. Turning a well-known physical process into a fully adjustable production process. Of course we have seen the Sun or other elements leave their mark on other products in the past, but this one has such a clever twist :-)