Concrete villa by Agustín Lozada has coarse walls to suit its rugged hilltop setting

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This board-marked concrete residence by architect Agustín Lozada features a series of terraces and pools, offering views over a valley in Argentina's Sierras Chicas hills (+ slideshow).

En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada

Named La Cuesta House, the 380-square-metre residence is formed of a series of cast-concrete blocks, set into the steep terrain of the landscape near Córdoba.

En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada

The entrance is set on the building's uppermost floor, which sits level with the hilltop, while subsequent rooms are concealed within the hillside.

En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada

"Lying above tough slopes, this is a house that makes the architecture and the land meet through open spaces," said the Argentinian architect.



"Due to the mountainous topography, terraces, balconies and patios were developed in order to get a close look of the outside land, but direct contact with the soil is not common because everything happens above the ground."

En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada

A pedestrian bridge links the slope at the rear of the house and a gravelled terrace on the flat rooftop. Here, a semi-circular pool of water and a bright red bench are intended to provide a peaceful spot from which to observe the landscape.

En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada

The terrace sits directly above the primary living and dining area, which links with a second terrace and swimming pool where the residents can take in panoramic views of the verdant hills and urban valley. Below, there are four bedrooms and bathrooms.

En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada

Accents of brightly coloured paintwork accentuate details including the open staircases, but the majority of the concrete interior is left unfinished.

En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada

"The inside recalls a cavern," said Lozada. "The main idea was to hide from the outside world while circulating, and open up to the views in those areas in which people remain."

En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada

"The sense was to adjust to the nature of the place," he added. "Some of the chosen materials were reinforced concrete and local rocks, in order to cause the lowest possible natural impact."

En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada

Lozada previously designed a bright white house with a slatted roof and pool in the foothills of the same mountain range.

Photography is by Gonzalo Viramonte.


Project credits:

Architect: Agustín Lozada
Executed by: Orange ObrasCiviles

En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada
Axonometric diagram – click for larger image
En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada
Site plan – click for larger image
En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada
Level one – click for larger image
En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada
Level two – click for larger image
En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada
Level three – click for larger image
En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada
Section one – click for larger image
En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada
Section two – click for larger image
En La Cuesta House by Agustin Lozada
Section three – click for larger image
  • J

    Stunning use of concrete. This is spectacular design.

  • spadestick

    Shoddy concrete work.

  • Architects Anonymous

    Nice.

  • Leo

    The house is beautiful, but I don’t think that concrete causes the “lowest possible natural impact.”

  • Kay

    I want to go to there.