Hyper-collage photography
by Jim Kazanjian

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Hyper-collage photography by Jim Kazanjian

These fictional views of imaginary architecture and landscapes are photographic collages produced by American CGI artist Jim Kazanjian.

Hyper-collage photography by Jim Kazanjian

Above: untitled (tomb), 2012
Top: untitled (temple), 2012

Kazanjian never takes any photographs himself, but instead combines as many as 50 images found on the internet to create each collage in the series.

Hyper-collage photography by Jim Kazanjian

Above: untitled (chateau), 2011

"My method of construction has an improvisational and random quality to it, since it is largely driven by the source material I have available," says Kazanjian. "I think of the work as a type of mutation which can haphazardly spawn in numerous and unpredictable directions."

Hyper-collage photography by Jim Kazanjian

Above: untitled (folly), 2010

His latest two images (top) are referred to as "temple" and "tomb", and show a fortification that appears to be sat on a beach and an entanglement of scaffolding structures engulfed beneath a layer of snow and ice.

Hyper-collage photography by Jim Kazanjian

Above: untitled (low tide), 2009

The artist cites the horror novels of early twentieth century writers H.P. Lovecraft and Algernon Blackwood as inspiration. He explains: "I am intrigued with the narrative archetypes these writers utilise to transform the commonplace into something sinister and foreboding."

Hyper-collage photography by Jim Kazanjian

Above: untitled (house), 2006

Jim Kazanjian started the series in 2006. His first image featured a dense cluster of buildings balanced above a crumbling pier (above), while others completed since then include a crumbling house being struck by lightning (below) and a castle-like building atop a waterfall.

Hyper-collage photography by Jim Kazanjian

Above: untitled (exterior), 2010

Other manipulated photography projects completed recently include images of houses that appear to be sailing through the sky and collaged landscapes that form complete circles. See more manipulated photography on Dezeen.

Hyper-collage photography by Jim Kazanjian

Above: untitled (backyard), 2011

Here's a statement from Kazanjian:


My images are digitally manipulated composites built from photographs I find online. The technique I use could be considered "hyper-collage". I cobble together pieces from photos I find interesting and feed them into Photoshop. Through a palimpsest-like layering process of adding and subtracting, I gradually blend the various parts together. I am basically manipulating and assembling a disparate array of multiple photographic elements (sometimes more than 50) to produce a single homogenized image. I do not use a camera at any stage in the process.

Hyper-collage photography by Jim Kazanjian

Above: untitled (outpost), 2008

My method of construction has an improvisational and random quality to it, since it is largely driven by the source material I have available. I wade through my archive constantly and search for interesting combinations and relationships. Each new piece I bring to the composition informs the image's potential direction. It is an iterative and organic process where the end result is many times removed from its origin. I think of the work as a type of mutation which can haphazardly spawn in numerous and unpredictable directions.

Hyper-collage photography by Jim Kazanjian

Above: untitled (fortification), 2008

I've chosen photography as a medium because of the cultural misunderstanding that it has a sort of built-in objectivity. This allows me to set up a visual tension within the work, to make it resonate and lure the viewer further inside. My current series is inspired by the classic horror literature of H.P. Lovecraft, Algernon Blackwood and similar authors. I am intrigued with the narrative archetypes these writers utilize to transform the commonplace into something sinister and foreboding. In my work, I prefer to use these devices as a means to generate entry points for the viewer. I'm interested in occupying a space where the mundane intersects the strange, and the familiar becomes alien. In a sense, I am attempting to render the sublime.

Hyper-collage photography by Jim Kazanjian

Above: untitled (structure), 2007

  • Petr Zenkl

    Some of them remind me of Howl's Moving Castle. Great work!

  • http://www.ljphotographystudio.com/ billystudd

    Awesome.

  • art_bs

    "Hyper-collage"? Jerry Uelsmann did this decades ago without digital technology.