House in Nanakuma
by MOVEDESIGN

| 9 comments
 

A staircase folds around a double-height bookcase inside this wooden family house in Fukuoka, Japan, by local architects MOVEDESIGN (+ slideshow).

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN

Illuminated from all sides by skylights, clerestory glazing and various windows, the staircase was designed by MOVEDESIGN to connect all three floors of House in Nanakuma, creating a well-lit study space that is surrounded by books and other personal items.

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN

"We can see the sky from one window, or the green of trees from other windows," explained the architects. "These window pictures change with the eye level walking up and down the stairs, making our minds calm and peaceful."

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN

Internal walls were added sparingly, so the staircase leads straight into rooms on each floor. "The individual spaces are continuous so that the family can have privacy and also feel the presence of each other," said the architects.

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN

On the ground floor, the staircase opens out to a living and dining room where all food preparation and dining is accommodated by a single wooden island. Translucent panels conceal storage areas behind, while a traditional Japanese room sits off to one side.

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN

A living room occupies the basement floor and opens out to sunken terraces on both sides of the building. A long and narrow window offers a view out to the largest of these two spaces, which is overshadowed by a small balcony on the floor above.

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN

Walls on this floor feature exposed concrete surfaces, contrasting with the wooden walls and partitions elsewhere in the house.

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN

The main bedroom is located on the uppermost floor, alongside a second Japanese room and a small roof terrace.

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN

We've published several unusual houses from Japan so far this summer. Others include a combined home and dog-grooming salon and a house that is just 2.7 metres wide. See more Japanese houses »

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN

Other combined staircases and bookshelves on Dezeen include one in a Rotterdam townhouse and one inside a house in Osaka. See more staircases combined with bookshelves »

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN

Photography is by Yousuke Harigane.

Here's a project description from MOVEDESIGN:


House in Nanakuma

This house is located in Fukuoka, Japan. Reinforced concrete for basement and wood flame for two floors on the ground.

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN

Three floors are in layers, different generations of this family live in this layered house. The individual spaces are continuous so that the family can have privacy and also feel the presence of each other.

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN

The role of the large staircase is an apparatus to connect three layers. It takes sunlight and connects the air with the house. The stairs are the main traffic line, there are some windows cut outside scenery. We can see the sky from one window, or the green of trees from other windows. These window pictures change with the eye level walking up and down the stairs, making our minds calm and peaceful.

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN
Basement level plan - click for larger image and key

The staircase and windows were planned to control the opening to the outside, cutting the scenery, saving energy, bringing requisite sunlight and a wind through the house. We hope that three people of this family having different generations can have individual lifestyles for their day life.

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN
Ground floor plan - click for larger image and key

Architects: MOVEDESIGN
Designer: Mikio Sakamoto

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN
First floor plan - click for larger image and key

Function: private house
Location: Nanakuma, Fukuoka, Japan
Structure: reinforced concrete + wood frame

House in Nanakuma by MOVEDESIGN
Cross section - click for larger image

Site area: 126.68 sqm
Architectural area: 54.64 sqm
Total floor area: 142.68 sqm
Year: 2013

  • Jaśko

    It is a very good design. But come on, every japanese designed house looks kind of the same. And it must be so loud there.

    • b

      I’ll take 10000 of these over the suburban crap built around these parts.

  • Des

    Where do they get so much wood?

    • WiseGuy

      From a collection of trees often referred to as a forest?

  • mindgame

    Railings in a modern japanese house? Blasphemy!

  • paul bruce

    The next step is to create living spaces accessible from the sides of the stairs, utilising a portion of the empty space between floors.

  • terry allen rubin

    I was in Japan years ago and loved it for so many reasons, the list is too long. I would love to live in one of those houses, next to people who have pride. Yes, that would be first on my list. Japan has pride in their design, food and so on.

  • http://www.melgreendesign.com Mel

    Note how the rooms are designed around the Tatami Mats. They are all proportional and very serene. The use of local and regional wood sources probably helps their budget.

    A beautiful design and as someone commented probably loud, although I would imagine that the owners would take care of sublimating noise.

    Although it is small in area, the feeling of spaciousness is very interesting. I’d love to see how they decorate the place and how they use it in their day-to-day lives!

  • Marc

    Nice design but the stair railings are definitely not acceptable. Very dangerous for children.