Wen Jing Lai mixes knives and forks with
chopsticks to create Westiental cutlery

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Wesiental Cutlery by Wen Jing Lai

Kingston University graduate Wen Jing Lai has fused western and eastern cutlery to create a series of hybrid eating utensils.

Wesiental Cutlery by Wen Jing Lai

China-born designer Wen Jing Lai created variations on traditional archetypal utensils that take elements from both of the cultures she has experienced.

Wesiental Cutlery by Wen Jing Lai

"I wanted to use something very typical to represent a culture, so instead of looking at clothes, I thought that cutlery and dining rituals are very distinctive between the west and the east," Lai told Dezeen.

Wesiental Cutlery by Wen Jing Lai

She began combining elements from chopsticks and spoons used in the east with forks, knives and spoons from western dinner tables.

Wesiental Cutlery by Wen Jing Lai

"I first created a fork with the traditional metal handle, but replaced the teeth with bamboo - a material that is often used to produce chopsticks," said Lai.

Wesiental Cutlery by Wen Jing Lai

"This led to a series of cutlery that has been merged in terms of material, form and function in order to express this phenomenon," she said.

Wesiental Cutlery by Wen Jing Lai

Each Westiental utensil combines eastern and western characteristics to different degrees: some are more akin to chopsticks while others still perform like knives and forks.

Wesiental Cutlery by Wen Jing Lai

Materials are mixed and matched so chopstick-shaped items are made in stainless steel, and knife and fork handles are produced in bamboo.

Wesiental Cutlery by Wen Jing Lai

Clay and different woods have also been utilised to create the hybrid cutlery, mostly joined by hand.

Wesiental Cutlery by Wen Jing Lai

How easy the cutlery is to use depends on the adaptability of the user and the food being eaten, Lai explained.

Wesiental Cutlery by Wen Jing Lai

"The ease-of-use depends on the user and how familiar they are with both cultures, if you are used to using cutlery from both then some of them are easier to use," she said. "It also depends on the type of food you eat."

Wesiental Cutlery by Wen Jing Lai

"I hope that this range can promote to the others a better understanding of my own culture across the different aspects of our lives," she added.

Wesiental Cutlery by Wen Jing Lai

The collection was on display at the Kingston University graduate show earlier this month, along with a kettle shaped like mugs to save water when making tea and a fashion collection sculpted from metal fabrics. See more 2014 graduate projects »

Wesiental Cutlery by Wen Jing Lai

  • http://centralmovers.com.my/ Central Movers

    They do not seem functional to me. I still prefer traditional cutlery.