Liddicoat & Goldhill adds brick and concrete townhouse to the end of a London terrace

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This end-of-terrace house in west London by Liddicoat & Goldhill features a fully glazed rear section that allows daylight to reach neighbouring properties (+ movie).

The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill

London-based Liddicoat & Goldhill designed the brick and concrete Tailored House for a Kensington site damaged by bombing in the second world war, to complete an existing terrace of Victorian townhouses.

The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill

Numerous challenges and restrictions influenced the design of the house, including a tightly controlled budget, risk of flooding, party wall negotiations, the awkward shape of the site, and the need to maintain the rights to light of the adjacent houses.

The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill

The result is a property that mimics the properties of its neighbours and continues the building line, but also introduces several contemporary details – including a concrete window bay and the predominantly glazed rear section.

The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill

"The house succeeds in neither aping neighbours, nor becoming an aggregation of responses to different legislative requirements," explained architects David Liddicoat and Sophie Goldhill who also recently transformed an 18th-century barn into a home.



"Instead, the project seeks to create a new London house type, subtly differentiated from its forbears."

The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill

The building's roof angles steeply to ensure plenty of daylight can reach the properties behind.

This rear section is cranked outwards to make the most of the space available on the irregularly-shaped plot, and its glazed walls bring plenty of natural light into the interior.

The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill

"The sheer brickwork wall gives way to a screen of metal fins that conceal sheer glazing behind," the architects added.

"This barrier affords privacy and filtered light to both the occupants and their neighbours."


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Bronze-framed windows are integrated into the angled upper portion of the end elevation. Glazed doors below open from the living room onto a small courtyard with a glass floor that allows light to filter down to the kitchen and dining area below.

The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill

The layered arrangement of the street-facing elevation references the treatment of the adjoining terrace, while the use of pale brick nods to nearby buildings and the history of brick construction in London.

The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill

Subtle details introduce modern touches to the facade, including the smooth concrete surfaces of the bay containing the entrance and first-floor windows.

The same material is used for the window reveals on the storey above and for a cornice featuring an angular relief pattern.

The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill

A skylight embedded in the steeply sloped roof illuminates a stairwell that is positioned along the party wall, while further glazed roof panels enable daylight to reach a small bathroom at the front of the house and a stair that descends to the basement level.

The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill

Brick is used throughout the interior to create continuity between indoor and outdoor spaces. The textural walls are complemented by wooden flooring and joinery with a strong grain that adds warmth to the daylight spaces.

The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill

The building was given the name the Tailored House, in tribute to the complexity of the design.

"Our clients drew the analogy between their new house and a tailored suit," claimed the architects. "When viewed as a whole it is recognisable, elegant and simple and belies the complexity of its fabrication. However, on closer inspection, greater individuality and material opulence is revealed."

The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill

Liddicoat & Goldhill is based in Dalston, east London. Other projects by the studio include an extension to a south London home featuring an oak-screened staircase and double-height windows, and a garden cabin with an angular roof.

Photography is by Will Scott.

The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill
3D section diagram – click for larger image
The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill
Basement floor plan – click for larger image
The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill
First floor plan – click for larger image
The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill
Second floor plan – click for larger image
The Tailored House by Liddicoat & Goldhill
Third floor plan – click for larger image
  • NYdesigner

    Everything about this is beautiful. Well done.

  • Z-dog

    Can I be the asshole to point out that the timber stair threads don’t comply with Part K?

    1.9 Steps may have open risers if they comply with both of the following guidance.
    a. Overlap treads by a minimum of 16mm
    b. Construct the steps so that a 100mm diameter sphere cannot pass through the open risers.

    I’m counting a 2.5 brick gap between them which seems closer to 180mm. Perhaps the architect will install the missing risers following the photographs.

    Oddly, the external metal stairs seems to have the typical ‘lip-down’ and ‘lip-up’ that is used to comply in the UK.

    • dave brubeck

      Get out more.

      • Meme

        To Dave, relax, man.

      • Z-dog

        If you find this stuff boring, you’re on the wrong webpage. The codes can be frustrating but good designers can work with them.

        In my opinion, ignoring the codes for the sake of ‘architecture’ shows an inherent lack of ability as a designer. [Insert quote about avoiding accessible design].

        In this case, my frustration is that the designer clearly shows a knowledge of the solution in one photo and the opposite in another!

  • SteveLeo

    You’ve put Sophie Soldhill instead of Goldhill.

    • Oops! Thanks for pointing this out. We’ve updated the story accordingly.