Dyslexic designers challenge stigma of condition with designjunction exhibition

London Design Festival 2016: ten dyslexic designers from the worlds of illustration, homeware and fashion are showing work at this year's designjunction exhibition in London (+ slideshow). 

Featuring the likes of Sebastian Bergne, Vitamin and Kristjana S Williams, the Dyslexic Design show will cover a range of tableware, lighting and garments.

Dyslexic designers exhibit work at designjunction during the London Design Festival
Egg decanter by Sebastian Bergne comes with a cork stopper and place holder, which allows the vessel to sit upright or tilt, raising its end

The exhibition aims to explore the connections between the condition and creativity, focusing on combating the stigma surrounding dyslexia and challenging perceptions of it as a disability.

Dyslexic designers exhibit work at designjunction during the London Design Festival
The Gauge crystal vase is by Jim Rokos, who is also curating the exhibition at London's Kings Cross Granary Square

"It is my belief that I am able to design the way I do because of my dyslexia and not despite it," said curator Jim Rokos, who is also exhibiting. "I also firmly believe that other dyslexic designers have idiosyncratic styles because of their dyslexia."

Featuring in the exhibition is London designer Sebastian Bergne's Egg Decanter – an oval glass container that can be positioned at different angles without spilling its contents.

Dyslexic designers exhibit work at designjunction during the London Design Festival
Pendant light fittings dangled on knotted cords are being exhibited by Vitamin

Rokos, a British industrial designer, has contributed a crystal flower vase with a similarly rounded profile that can rock back and forth on its base. Pendant lighting from Vitamin – suspended on a knotted cord – is also being shown, alongside a coiled wooden lamp by Tom Raffield.

Illustration is represented through an embroidered gorgon and an intricate map by Tina Crawford and Kristjana S Williams, and fashion through a range of jackets designed by Rohan Chhabra shaped to resemble endangered animals like gorillas.

Dyslexic designers exhibit work at designjunction during the London Design Festival
Also on show is a light shade made from coiled ribbons of wood by Tom Raffield

A dyslexic designer, Henry Franks, was the recipient of the 2013 New Design of the Year Award, for a range of unconventional products inspired by his condition.

London designer Dan Britton also highlighted issues faced by sufferers with a piecemeal typeface that simulated the challenges experienced by dyslexic readers.

Dyslexic designers exhibit work at designjunction during the London Design Festival
Rohan Chhabra is showing a selection of hunting jackets that have been modified to resemble endangered animals from his Embodying Ethics: Endangered project

"I am delighted designjunction shares my vision and desire to remove the unwanted and unwarranted stigma sometimes associated with dyslexia and in doing so change perceptions of it," said Roka. "We believe dyslexia is something that drives and inspires creative thought and design."

Dyslexic designers exhibit work at designjunction during the London Design Festival
Illustration is represented with an intricate map of London designed by Kristjana S Williams

Designjunction is on annually during the London Design Festival. Dyslexic Design will feature during this year's show at 1 Granary Square, Kings Cross from 22 to 25 September 2016. A percentage of ticket sales will be donated to the British Dyslexia Association.