House in Kokubunji by
Suppose Design Office

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Slideshow: overlapping openings in the walls and ceilings of this Tokyo house by Japanese architects Suppose Design Office create dozens of views between rooms.

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Contained within a rectangular wooden volume, the family house accommodates rooms for living and sleeping on its two main floors, plus an open-plan loft accessed by ladders.

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Some rooms on the ground floor are set at a lower level than the corridors, while the attic storage areas are raised up slightly higher than the surrounding floor.

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Narrow handrails screen balconies on the upper two floors, so residents have to be careful not to slip over the edges.

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Other popular houses by Suppose Design Office include one where interior walls don't touch the floor - see more projects by the architects here.

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

You can also see all our stories about houses in Japan here.

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Here's a few key details from the architects:


House in Kokubunji

Location: Kokubunji city,Tokyo,Japan

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Principal use: personal house

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Site area: 109.11sqm

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Building area: 62.53sqm

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Total floor area: 119.21sqm ( 1F:62.53sqm 2F:56.68sqm )

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Completion: September. 2011

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Design period: November.2009-December.2010

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Construction period: December.2010-September. 2011

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Structure: Wood

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Storeys: 2

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Client: a couple and two children

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Project architect: Makoto Tanijiri [suppose design office]+ Hiroshi Ohno [Ohno JAPAN]

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Project team: Makoto Tanijiri [suppose design office]+ Hiroshi Ohno [Ohno JAPAN], in-charge;Keisuke Katayama

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Ground floor plan

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

First floor plan

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Second floor plan

House in Kokubunji by Suppose Design Office

Cross section

  • Maria

    I like the concept but why are there no openings in the facade to let the light in. It seems a little bit too dark with artificial light instead of natural.

    • DK405

      There are several windows in the house. Most importantly there are giant skylights. If you look closer you will notice a significant amount of natural light. The house faces a busy road in Tokyo so they had to bring in natural light from the top instead of front facing windows. IMO the solution is rather clever.

  • http://www.pasinga.com Antje

    pure – elegant – minimal but inviting and cosy … let me just say I love it – definitely the Wow Effect

  • Pam

    Beautiful work! Amazing use of texture, seems very wabi-sabi. There is one photo with a tv perched somewhat awkwardly in the corner away from the chair setup, looks weird, but I wouldn't blame the architecture for that.

  • edward

    Silly! No other word for it. The real requirements of family subordinated to an aesthetic notion and not a very good one. .

    • jordan

      I completely disagree here. Whilst there is an aesthetic of pure minimal both in materiality and function, these guys time and time again produce incredibly exciting and novel spaces that experiment with modes of family interaction and activity. These might not always be successful, and yes sometimes they seem silly – but at least they are testing boundaries. Seems japanese building codes allow for this kind of flexibility.. Which is fantastic imo.

      Also bear in mind that family requirements vary with culture. Many families in Japan hold a very different view of privacy, for instance, compared to what you might be used to.

  • st.st.

    come on this is great! pure adventure for children and complex space to live in!

  • Lee

    I love the space, yet just a bit worried to walk down and up even when you just want to sit!

  • MMM

    Does anyone have any idea what is the purpose for the third floor? Frankly the design is nice and unique, but sorry to say I found the space inside the house especially the 3rd floor is lack of purpose and it’s more like a game room for children.

  • Jason

    I like the concept too. But overall I have lonely mood feeling.